Posts Tagged ‘BookSneeze’

This book takes a closer look at the war on terrorism being waged by the United States. The Fight of Our Lives delves into the role of radical Islam in everything from not only to 9/11, but also to the incident at Fort Hood and the Iranian regime. While the Islamic terrorist have remained committed and resolute, this book also looks at how the American desire and will to fight seems to have waned.  This book also goes through many of the areas where errors have been made and leaders have yielded to the pressure for diversity. In an attempt to not appear bigoted, American defense has become weaker.

I enjoyed many aspects of this book, but found it lacking in some areas. I agree with most of what is portrayed in this book. The United States is weaker as a nation and we have work to do to prevent  future events from happening. However, this  book was a little more political in nature than religion based. Being listed in the Christianity/Religion section, I was hoping to find more than one chapter that was dedicated to that aspect. The book is well written and is easy to read, while offering a wealth of great information. If you are looking for something from more of a political or cultural view, this book is great. If you looking for something from a religious point of view, there just isn’t much here. Overall, still a good book with many great points.

 

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through Booksneeze Blogger Review Program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.

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Galileo Galilei 4

Image via Wikipedia

Galileo by Mitch Stokes is a look into the life and faith of Galileo Galilei. Known by many already as a great scientist, Galileo was also guided by a faith that did not pit science vs. church. This book shows the relationship Galileo saw between science, mathematics and faith. Follow Galileo through his many scientific discoveries, his troubles with the Roman Catholic Church, and eventually until his death.

This biography was very interesting to read, and was very well written by the author. Biographies can tend to be very dry, but I never found that to be the case with this book. While the faith of Galileo is evident in the book, it was not expounded upon in this book as much as I would have liked to see. Much time is spent on the scientific discoveries of this great scientist, but little is shown of how his faith played a role until his troubles with the church. He was a good Roman Catholic in that he deferred to the authority of the church on matters of faith and even science when they collided with the views of the Roman Catholic church. It is interesting to look back and see areas of science that Galileo was correct about, but backed off because the church wrongly believed something else. I would recommend reading this book. It presents a picture of Galileo that you may not know. You will find a man that definitely shaped science, and what it means to be a christian scientist.

 

Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher through the BookSneeze®.com <http://BookSneeze®.com> book review bloggers program. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 <http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/waisidx_03/16cfr255_03.html> : “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”